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The difference between UI Designer and UI Developer

In a previous post I talked about developers distinguishing themselves as specialists in a particular part of the application e.g. server side, gui, database etc. This kind of specialisation is counter productive to creating good software. However, there are roles where the specialisation is important.

One such specialisation is the role of the GUI Designer. To be more precise the roles of an Art Director and a User Experience Consultant. The User Experience Consultant works with the customer/business analyst to understand the UI requirements and creates user journeys / screen mocks to define how a user will interact with the system. An Art Director takes these mocks and creates graphical representation of these, adhering to the customer branding. It's the job of the Art Director to present design choices, helping the customer create a suitable and effective look and feel for the UI. The UI Developer then takes the Design Guidelines from the Art Director and create a faithful representation in the UI technology of choice.

These roles - especially that of the Art Director - are highly specialised and are disciplines in their own right. A developer should not be expected to fullfil them. Yet most people in the Software Engineering industry have not even heard of these. Consequently the most important part of the UI Application - i.e. the User Interface - are put together as an afterthought.

About the author

Mash is a pragmatic software craftsman always looking to improve his software creation skills and helping others do the same. He firmly believes that a well-rounded software craftsman must have a keen interest in all aspects of software creation, including; process, people, technology, user experience, development, operation, maintenance, and social impact. He relishes the daily challenges that Codurance brings to him–stretching his existing knowledge and expertise allowing him to constantly grow as a professional.

Mash is an advisor and a leader. During his diverse career, he has succeeded in invigorating large ailing software projects as well as creating highly effective software teams and departments. His broad and deep technical knowledge, organisational skills, craft focus, and empathy to people involved have been integral to his success. He has worked in many roles for charities, investment banks, consultancies, government, media and cloud providers. He prides himself at being a hands-on software developer and believes that software development skills are very hard to learn and the best way to maintain them is to apply them.

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