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Queue Based Synchronisation

The first rule of using locks for thread synchronisation is, "Do NOT use them!". Recently I saw an implementation that made heavy use of locks to synchronise access to a shared cache between two threads. The overall approach is explained in the diagram below:

Lock based synchronisation

Why not do the whole thing in a single thread? Well! the operations to the External Store are very time consuming and Thread-1 does not need to wait for them. So how do you solve this without using lock-based synchronisation?

The operations to the cache are very quick and can be done in a single thread. These operations are coming from multiple threads. We can funnel them through a single thread by using a thread-safe queue as explained in the following diagram:

Queue based synchronisation

Although this solution looks more complicated, the key advantage is that no low-level thread synchronisation is needed. Most good programming languages already provide thread-safe queues. Also, you can scale up using a thread pool for the operations to the external store.

Note: in both of the above approaches we need to ensure that the cache does not grow indefinitely. In case of the queue based approach we can use a a queue that blocks after a maximum capacity is reached. In case of the lock based approach the cache itself will need to block.

About the author

Mash is a pragmatic software craftsman always looking to improve his software creation skills and helping others do the same. He firmly believes that a well-rounded software craftsman must have a keen interest in all aspects of software creation, including; process, people, technology, user experience, development, operation, maintenance, and social impact. He relishes the daily challenges that Codurance brings to him–stretching his existing knowledge and expertise allowing him to constantly grow as a professional.

Mash is an advisor and a leader. During his diverse career, he has succeeded in invigorating large ailing software projects as well as creating highly effective software teams and departments. His broad and deep technical knowledge, organisational skills, craft focus, and empathy to people involved have been integral to his success. He has worked in many roles for charities, investment banks, consultancies, government, media and cloud providers. He prides himself at being a hands-on software developer and believes that software development skills are very hard to learn and the best way to maintain them is to apply them.

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